de Young Museum
Happy Wednesday! 
 
Couple in Front of Church, Los Angeles, 1970. On view in Anthony Friedkin’s #gayessay.

Happy Wednesday!

 

Couple in Front of Church, Los Angeles, 1970. On view in Anthony Friedkin’s #gayessay.

"Most people don’t learn how to see. They ‘think’ what they see. I try to separate the mind, and to see with the mind at rest." - Ellsworth Kelly, 1994. (Orange Green, 1966. Oil on canvas)

"Most people don’t learn how to see. They ‘think’ what they see. I try to separate the mind, and to see with the mind at rest." - Ellsworth Kelly, 1994. (Orange Green, 1966. Oil on canvas)

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Mesmerizing. Frank Stella, Flin Flon IV, 1969. Polymer and fluorescent polymer paint on canvas.

fineartsmuseumssf:

Mesmerizing. Frank Stella, Flin Flon IV, 1969. Polymer and fluorescent polymer paint on canvas.

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What did we look like almost 90 years ago? Aerial view of the M. H. de Young Museum, ca. 1925 #sf #goldengatepark

fineartsmuseumssf:

What did we look like almost 90 years ago? Aerial view of the M. H. de Young Museum, ca. 1925 #sf #goldengatepark

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Just follow the road…

fineartsmuseumssf:

Just follow the road…

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July celebrates not only the birth of the American nation, but also that of many notable artists from various time periods and artistic movements. As the month draws to a close, here’s a quick look at some important figures and their works which have passed through the galleries of the de Young and Legion of Honor.

July 9th: David Hockney (1937)

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Image courtesy of © David Hockney

The de Young presented David Hockney: A Bigger Exhibition, from October 26, 2013 through January 20, 2014. Assembled by Hockney exclusively for the de Young, this exhibition marked the return to California of the most influential and best-known British artist of his generation.

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Amidst a suite of art historical references including Matthias Grünewald’s Isenheim Altarpiece (1512–1516) and Cubism, Jasper Johns hangs three ghoulish, bleeding cast-wax forearms from hooks. The artist made these casts from the same model (a friend’s son) at three-year intervals, and they “grow” and “age” from left to right. Each arm drips a different color of blood: red, yellow, or blue. The painting’s title is referenced beneath the blue arm, where Johns silkscreened reproductions of pages from John Cage’s 1943–1944 composition, “The Perilous Night.” On view now in Modernism from the National Gallery of Art: The Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection. 
Jasper Johns (American, b. 1930). Perilous Night, 1982. Encaustic on canvas with objects. National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, Collection of Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Art © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Amidst a suite of art historical references including Matthias Grünewald’s Isenheim Altarpiece (1512–1516) and Cubism, Jasper Johns hangs three ghoulish, bleeding cast-wax forearms from hooks. The artist made these casts from the same model (a friend’s son) at three-year intervals, and they “grow” and “age” from left to right. Each arm drips a different color of blood: red, yellow, or blue. The painting’s title is referenced beneath the blue arm, where Johns silkscreened reproductions of pages from John Cage’s 1943–1944 composition, “The Perilous Night.” On view now in Modernism from the National Gallery of Art: The Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection

Jasper Johns (American, b. 1930). Perilous Night, 1982. Encaustic on canvas with objects. National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, Collection of Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Art © Jasper Johns/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

Shamanism of the Pacific Northwest may have originated in the practices of ancestors from what is now Siberia, who traversed the Bering Strait and navigated the waters of the Arctic and Pacific oceans to come to these lands tens of thousands of years ago. A shaman served as the people’s primary point of contact with the supernatural realm. Equipment such as rattles and crowns of bear claws created sonic aids to better communicate with the spirit world and foster the health of individuals and the community. These and other objects would often depict the spirit companions of the shaman. 
On view in Lines on the Horizon: Native American Art from the Weisel Family Collection. 
Bear effigy, ca. 1870. Haida. Wood and paint. Gift of the Thomas W. Weisel Family to the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. 2013.76.126

Shamanism of the Pacific Northwest may have originated in the practices of ancestors from what is now Siberia, who traversed the Bering Strait and navigated the waters of the Arctic and Pacific oceans to come to these lands tens of thousands of years ago. A shaman served as the people’s primary point of contact with the supernatural realm. Equipment such as rattles and crowns of bear claws created sonic aids to better communicate with the spirit world and foster the health of individuals and the community. These and other objects would often depict the spirit companions of the shaman. 

On view in Lines on the Horizon: Native American Art from the Weisel Family Collection

Bear effigy, ca. 1870. Haida. Wood and paint. Gift of the Thomas W. Weisel Family to the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. 2013.76.126

Meditation room now open in Modernism from the National Gallery of Art: The Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection. 
Barnett Newman (American, 1905-1970). Stations of the Cross, 1958—1960. Oil on canvas. Collection of Robert and Jane Meyerhoff. National Gallery of Art.

Meditation room now open in Modernism from the National Gallery of Art: The Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Collection

Barnett Newman (American, 1905-1970). Stations of the Cross, 1958—1960. Oil on canvas. Collection of Robert and Jane Meyerhoff. National Gallery of Art.

Happy birthday, Jim Dine! Along with several of his contemporaries, including Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein, and Sam Francis, Dine collaborated with Chinese-American poet Walasse Ting on the masterwork, 1 ¢ Life. The subject of the exhibition, "A book like hundred flower garden": Walasse Ting’s 1 ¢ Life, the impressive artist book is now on view in Gallery 17. 
Jim Dine (American, b. 1935). Untitled, Plates on pp. 144-145 in the book, 1 ¢ Life, 1964. Color lithograph. Museum purchase, Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts Endowment Fund. 1965.68.204.61

Happy birthday, Jim Dine! Along with several of his contemporaries, including Robert Rauschenberg, Roy Lichtenstein, and Sam Francis, Dine collaborated with Chinese-American poet Walasse Ting on the masterwork, 1 ¢ Life. The subject of the exhibition, "A book like hundred flower garden": Walasse Ting’s 1 ¢ Life, the impressive artist book is now on view in Gallery 17. 

Jim Dine (American, b. 1935). Untitled, Plates on pp. 144-145 in the book, 1 ¢ Life, 1964. Color lithograph. Museum purchase, Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts Endowment Fund. 1965.68.204.61